Charo in the Spotlight

Charo is a lovely brindle brown and white Pittie mix who has been at the shelter since early July of this year. She’s about a year and a half old – a rambunctious pre-teen in dog years.

Charo (WCAC ID: 90561)
Charo (WCAC ID: 90561)

She is a spunky and outgoing pup who wants to be the center of everything and the life of the party. She would do great in a home that had a yard for her to romp in – note, she’s not going to be a candidate for dog parks as we’ve found her to be rather picky about her playmates in the Dogs Playing for Life play groups. But when she finds those guys she plays well with she is all in and has such a glorious time playing that you won’t be able to keep yourself from scheduling more play dates for her.

Charo will need some training – her previous life and time in the shelter has left her with some bad habits. She just needs a little etiquette training. May I suggest Teamworks Dog Training LLC – I’d love to see her in class.

Charo also had the opportunity to be one of Shannon Johnstone’s Landfill Dogs. Here are some of the great photos from Miss Charo’s private photo shoot.

Photos by Shannon Johnstone
Photos by Shannon Johnstone

Shannon tells me that Charo loves to play with toys and has a special affinity for tennis balls.

So, if you’re not afraid of a little work for the most terrific lifelong companion – stop by the Wake County Animal Center (WCAC) any day of the week between noon and 6 p.m. to meet this terrific girl. You can also check out all of the available pets on the Adoption Gallery (click here).

Do you have what it takes?

There are always pets in need – you see them everywhere you turn. Within the WCAC one of the ways you can help is to become a foster family. Granted, being a foster family is a tough gig (for obvious reasons) and not for everyone, but the rewards will make your heart grow three sizes every day.

But we need to talk about a few things, like …

  • You will most likely not be fostering cute fluffy small dogs or puppies. The reason is obvious once you hear it – they are the quickest to be adopted or rescued. It’s the big dogs and pit bull types that have spent months and months of their life in the shelter that need some time in a real home.
  • Itty bitty bottle-feeder kittens are not easy to foster. They’ve usually been turned in without their momma, which may mean that she abandoned them. This happens in nature for a reason. You will lose many of them and you won’t know why. They will seem happy and healthy when you go to bed and the next morning they will pass over to the RainbowBridge in your arms.
  • Special needs animals need you. There are always sick dogs and cats at the shelter, more than there is room for, and they need someplace “bug free” to get healthy and strengthen their immune systems. They have to be taken out of the general population to minimize the impact of illness on all the other animals. Let’s face it, if you’ve ever been in a shelter you know the noise and chaos quickly wears on your nerves – but you get to leave and go home. The same is true for many of the animals that come through the WCAC – it’s too much for them and they start to shut down or act crazy in the kennel. They need the love, comfort, and stability of a home and family to make them adoptable.

These are the shelter pets who need you. Next week I’ll talk a little bit about the process of becoming a foster for the WCAC and why it’s not an instant approval type process.

If you’d like to get started on becoming a foster click here and fill out the Foster Application.

It’s a tough job, but they need you!

2 thoughts on “Charo in the Spotlight

  1. Can’t wait for your follow-up about becoming a foster. We’ve just started the process and I’d love more of a “heads up!” 🙂

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